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Dejan Matlak PostManager
Dejan is an anthropologist with experience in academic writing and social science research. During his bachelor studies, he was a teaching assistant at the Research Centre of Petnica. Currently, he is listening to an MA program for Psychology, and he plans to do research and psychotherapy in the future.
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Dejan Matlak PostManager
Dejan is an anthropologist with experience in academic writing and social science research. During his bachelor studies, he was a teaching assistant at the Research Centre of Petnica. Currently, he is listening to an MA program for Psychology, and he plans to do research and psychotherapy in the future.
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Coffee consumption is an everyday activity for many people worldwide. We all have our favourite way of drinking coffee, and we also differ in the doses we take. Some among us like to drink several cups a day, and others don’t want to be near a cup.

Why do people differ in how much coffee they can drink?

The Study

The study about the correlation between coffee intake and cardiovascular disease comes from the University of South Australia. The lead researcher behind this study is Professor Elina Hyppönen, who is also director of UniSA’s Australian Centre for Precision Health. Furthermore, the study sample consists of 390,435 people.

The Genetics of Coffee Consumption

The study results indicate that there is casual genetic evidence that suggests that cardiovascular health influences coffee consumption. That is, the research team found that people with bad cardiovascular health (high blood pressure, angina, arrhythmia) were less likely to drink coffee. Furthermore, these results also indicate that our genetics actively regulate our caffeine intake and protect our health.

Regarding the team’s findings, Prof Hyppönen says:

“People drink coffee for all sorts of reasons… but what we don’t recognise is that people subconsciously self-regulate safe levels of caffeine based on how high their blood pressure is, and this is likely a result of a protective genetic mechanism. What this means is that someone who drinks a lot of coffee is likely more genetically tolerant of caffeine, as compared to someone who drinks very little.”

Our bodies are well equipped to send us warning signs that help us safeguard our health. Therefore, as Prof Hyppönen maintains, we should listen to such signals and stop drinking when the body tells us. Furthermore, this study also suggests that the amount of coffee you drink can indicate your cardiovascular health.

Relevant Research Article