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Dejan Matlak PostManager
An independent anthropologist with years of experience in academic writing and social science. His main field of interest is medical anthropology and the development of multidisciplinarian approaches for scientific research. He supports the furthering of science and critical thinking.
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Dejan Matlak PostManager
An independent anthropologist with years of experience in academic writing and social science. His main field of interest is medical anthropology and the development of multidisciplinarian approaches for scientific research. He supports the furthering of science and critical thinking.
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  • eggs
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How many eggs are good for you? Nutrition scientists have long been asking the question of what is the ideal measure for eating our favorite breakfast food. Although there is no conclusive answer, a new study from China reveals that eggs may increase our chance of diabetes.

About the Study

The University of Australia leads the international research team working on this project. Furthermore, the research was done in partnership with China Medical University, and Qatar University. Also, this was a longitudinal study (1991 and 2009) done in China on a sample of 8545 adults. Researchers working on this study aim to discover if daily consumption of eggs increases our chance of getting diabetes.

In recent years China saw an increase in diabetes among its population. Furthermore, the prevalence of diabetes in the county is above 11%, this is more than the global average of 8.5%. Besides the health burden, diabetes-related costs are also high and in China, they amount to $109 billion. Globally, they account for 10% of health expenditure, that is, $760 billion.

The increase in diabetes patients in China may be a result of dietary changes in the general population. That is, they are abandoning traditional sources of food like vegetables and grains and they are consuming energy-rich food.

The Results

The study shows that people who eat more than one egg per day increase their risk of diabetes by 50%. Furthermore, the study shows there is a steady increase in egg consumption in China. More precisely, in 1991-1993 the daily average per person was 16 grams and by 2009 it was 31 grams.

Epidemiologist and public health expert from China Dr. Ming Li commented on the research results with the following remarks.

“To beat diabetes, a multi-faceted approach is needed that not only encompasses research, but also a clear set of guidelines to help inform and guide the public. This study is one step towards that long-term goal.”

Main Takeaways

  • A new study from China reveals that daily consumption of eggs increases our chance of gaining diabetes by 50%.

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