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Dejan Matlak PostManager
An independent anthropologist with years of experience in academic writing and social science. His main field of interest is medical anthropology and the development of multidisciplinarian approaches for scientific research. He supports the furthering of science and critical thinking.
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Dejan Matlak PostManager
An independent anthropologist with years of experience in academic writing and social science. His main field of interest is medical anthropology and the development of multidisciplinarian approaches for scientific research. He supports the furthering of science and critical thinking.
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  • Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a condition treatable only with the aid of surgery. However, new medical research explores treatment through the use of medication.
  • This condition is also known as the “asthma of the sinuses”.
  • CRS is an inflammatory process that affects the nasal and sinus mucous membrane. Furthermore, it often occurs together with nasal polyps.

About the Study

The research team working on this chronic rhinosinusitis trial comes from the University of Cincinnati. That is, the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the UC College of Medicine. Also, the research findings from this trial are available through the journal International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology.

Chronic rhinosinusitis and Medical Therapy

CRS is a condition hard to treat with medication. Because of this, doctors usually seek the help of surgery.

Patients that suffer from the condition experience continuous and daily discomfort as they breathe. Not only that, but around 5% of the population in USA suffers from the condition. Giving additional cause to researchers in their quest to find a none-surgical alternative to its treatment.

The researchers observed sixty individuals with CRS and nasal polyps. For the purpose of the study, they were given a regimen of topical intranasal corticosteroid irrigations and short-oral corticosteroid taper.

Upon the completion of the study the researchers found 50% of the individuals had a reduction in symptoms. With this they show that it is possible to control symptoms of CRS without the need for surgery.

On a side note, if you have an interest in pharma research check out this recent news article about the thermo-responsive protein hydrogel.

Limitations

  • This treatment needs further research before we can determine how the medication affects the condition in the long run.