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Dejan Matlak PostManager
Dejan is an anthropologist with experience in academic writing and social science research. During his bachelor studies, he was a teaching assistant at the Research Centre of Petnica. Currently, he is listening to an MA program for Psychology, and he plans to do research and psychotherapy in the future.
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Dejan Matlak PostManager
Dejan is an anthropologist with experience in academic writing and social science research. During his bachelor studies, he was a teaching assistant at the Research Centre of Petnica. Currently, he is listening to an MA program for Psychology, and he plans to do research and psychotherapy in the future.
follow me
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  • A new study shows that cannabis use does not reduce the use of opioids by addicts.

About the Research

The new research on cannabis comes from McMaster University in Canada. The research findings are available through the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Cannabis use and Opioid Addiction

Opioid addiction is a medical problem that is hard to combat. Also, it leaves a permanent mark on the addict’s life. Because of this, researchers thought that marihuana may be a good alternative to opioid use. That is, they thought it is possible to give opioid addicts cannabis as a way to reduce their addictive needs.

Researchers from McMaster University set out to test this hypothesis and to examine the existing findings. Also, as part of their research, they did a systematic literature review to determine what other researchers wrote about the topic.

At the end of their research, they found six articles that look at the effect of cannabis in the process of methadone maintenance treatment. Furthermore, through the meta-analysis of the articles, the researchers found that cannabis use did not minimalize illicit opioid use. Not only that, but it’s use, had no effect on retaining people in the methadone maintenance treatment.

Related Articles:

Sleeping Pills May Decreases Suicidal Thoughts in Individuals with Insomnia and Depression

Limitation

  • The study considers the findings from only six articles.